100 Acts of Sewing ~ Garment Patterns by Sonya Philip

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Wanting for everyone to easily sew clothes, Sonya Philip began 100 Acts of Sewing as a personal challenge and learning, teaching experience to make 100 dresses in a year. So impressive! And her patterns are just the right mix of easy to wear, comfortable, and simple to make. They are perfect for showing off your favorite fabrics.

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Philip explains her inspiration on her website: “Making clothing is a conscious choice; it is an investment of time over convenience. The creation of a functional garment, engenders self-sufficiency and happiness.” These are great beginners patterns to help develop your garment sewing skills.

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Philip inspires us to “make and remake and make well.” And this is something easily done with her 100 Acts of Sewing patterns. These garments are grab and go for any occasion. We love the simplicity of the dresses, tunics, skirts, and pants. We find they are very adaptable, such as adding pockets of a contrasting fabric, sewing pretty bias tape around a sleeveless tunic, or adding gathered ruffles at the hem of pant legs.

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tumblr_nblqcbs5Tm1rr2zh0o1_500photo credit: Sonya Philip

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Patterns from 100 Acts of Sewing include a complete instruction booklet and sizes from XS – 4XL.

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tumblr_mq3zvuYjGY1rr2zh0o1_500photo credit: Sonya Philip

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At our shop, Ann made this sample of Dress No. 2 in a cotton/linen blend:

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Dress No. 2 is an excellent everyday long-sleeved dress with a slightly flared A-line that’s sure to be a wardrobe staple. You can shorten it into a tunic and wear with leggings or with contrasting linen pants. It’s a good piece to wear year round. You can adapt it by adding contrasting pockets, or bias tape finishing.

Katy made the 100 Acts of Sewing Skirt No 1. with beautiful Nani Iro Double Gauze:

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We’d love to see what you’ve made with your 100 Acts of Sewing pattern! If posting on social media, please hashtag: #fiddleheadartisansupply

 

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Posted in Dress Pattern, Fabric store, Inspiration for your weekend, New at the shop, Patterns, Sewing, Shop Sample

Sew a Double Sided Scarf

Scarves for Blog

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SUPPLIES:

  • Two Scarf Strips, or
  • 5/8 yard of two fabrics
  • Thread

Make the Scarf Strips From Your Fabric

If you are making your own strips, you will need 5/8 yard or less of each fabric. Rip each piece into two strips from selvedge to selvedge at your desired width, trim the selvedges off, and sew the ends together to make a long scarf strip. Trim down to your desired length.

We make the scarf strips that we sell at the shop 10″ wide and 72″ long. If you would like to make several scarves from the same fabric, you can make them the same way as we do: take a two yard cut of fabric and rip it into 10” wide strips down the length. You will have 4 scarf strips for a 44” wide fabric, and 5 strips for a 54” wide fabric.

Ripping the fabric means that the scarf strips will be on grain, which would be hard to get just right by cutting with scissors. In order to rip fabric, you make a small snip in the direction you are ripping. Then pull the two sides apart until you have two pieces. *** There are some fabrics that won’t rip. Knits won’t rip because they are knit and not woven, so there isn’t a grain to rip them on. There are also some wovens that won’t rip well too. While they might ultimately rip, we haven’t been able to rip linen and dupioni silk really well, so with those we try to line up the grain as well as possible, and then use scissors or a rotary cutter to make the strips.

Optional: (Prefer to buy your scarf strips already prepared and ready for sewing? Our Scarf Kits include two strips that are 10” x 72” each.)

Sewing the Scarf Strips

Place the two scarf strips together, right sides facing, and pin.

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Leaving a four inch opening along one of the longer sides, sew all the rest of the way around the strips, begin and end your sewing with a few back-stitches to strengthen the opening.

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Trim the corners.

Turn the scarf right side out. Press. Hand stitch the opening closed.

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Now top stitch with a similar (or contrasting) color thread around the scarf. At the corners, keep the needle in the down position, and then pivot the scarf. This keeps the fabric together and makes a nice neat corner.

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The patterns and color combinations are endless:

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Look how beautifully the Liberty of London Tana Lawn goes with Dupioni Silk:

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If posting on Instagram, use the hashtags #fiddleheaddoublesidedscarf and #fiddleheadartisansupply – we look forward to seeing your finished scarf. They are so satisfying, you’re going to want to make another one!

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Posted in DIY, Dupioni Silk, Liberty of London, Liberty Tana Lawn, Patterns, Sewing, Sewing Tutorial, Shop Sample, Tutorial

How to Make Jewelry with Glass Cabochons

Supplies:

Bezel Setting

Glass Cabochon to match the size of the Bezel Tray

Diamond Glaze

Tacky Glue or other adhesive

Decorative Paper (and colorful catalogs and recycled cards also work well)

Scissors

Glass cabochons make lovely jewelry and perfect gifts. For a background image, gather together colorful catalogs, recycled cards, and decorative paper. You’ll find making these rather addictive!

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Decorating the Glass Cabochon

Place the glass cabochon over decorative paper until you find the spot you want to use.

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Put a few drops of Diamond Glaze on the back of the cabochon so you are sure the whole back will be covered when it is pressed on the paper.

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Place the cabochon down on the paper, moving it around in place until you get it in just the right spot.

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If there is too much glue on the sides, wipe up the excess with a tissue or cotton swab.

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Once dry, cut away the extra paper around the edge of the cabochon.

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Setting the Glass into the Bezel

Place a few drops of Tacky Glue or other adhesive onto the tray of the bezel. Place the cabochon into the tray and allow to dry.

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Have fun creating with glass cabochons! This bezel was filled with Diamond glaze and glass glitter.

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Posted in Art Supllies, Art Supplies, Belfast Maine Shop, Craft, DIY, Inspiration for your weekend, New at the shop, Uncategorized

Felt Garland Sewing Pattern

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Supplies:

Felt Roll or Felt Sheets

Scissors

Sewing machine or a hand sewing needle

Thread

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One of our felt rolls will make a garland just over 4 yards long.

If you choose to pick your own colors from our felt sheets, each sheet will make about 4 feet of garland.

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Cut the Felt

Cut the strips in the rolls or the felt sheets into 2” squares. This can be done by hand with scissors or with a rotary cutter, ruler, and mat.

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Make the Circles

Cut the strips in the rolls or the felt sheets into 2” squares. Round the corners off with scissors to make the squares into circles.

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Sewing

Using your sewing machine, feed the circles in, one after the other, with the edges of the circles right up against each other them if you want them touching in the garland.

If hand sewing, use a running stitch and make a little backstitch at the beginning and end of each circle to avoid bunching.

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Trim your threads and you are done!

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Decorating

Fold the garland and hang it so that it has multiple strands that fall next to each other. Or, drape one or multiple strands between two points in your room.

Felt Garland Front Peach

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Our Thicket Pop-ups!

This tutorial describes how we figured out how to cut the thicket panels and sew them back together to make the out side panels for our Thicket Pop-ups.

(If you would like to skip all the figuring we did, and just want the cut list for each of the panels, scroll below and find the cutting section for each of the two sizes.)

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Thicket is Gingiber’s first fabric collection from Moda fabrics. It is all in black and cream or white. We went with the black and cream option, and have totally loved all of the prints, especially the panels! We had a quilt in mind, and that may still come, but in the meantime, we made some really sweet pop-up baskets, using the pattern and springs from The Fat Quarter Gypsy. With permission from The Fat Quarter Gypsy, we are writing here about how we figured out what size to cut out each of the animals from the pattern in order to get the right sized outside strip for each basket. You will of course still need to purchase a pattern to get all of the cutting and sewing directions to make them!

bouquet-in-orange-sleeping-porch-by-heather-rossFor the Medium sized pop-up basket, that uses the Small Thicket Animal Panel:

How I figured out what size to cut each animal block:

The side panel (before being sewn into a tube) is supposed to measure 9.5″ high by 26.5″ wide. The width of the panel is very important, and must not be changed. You can, though, change the height a bit as long as it doesn’t get too tall and wobbly… So, while the 9.5″ height works, a 10″ height for the sides will give the animals a bit more clearance on the top and bottom. I would suggest you do this. *This means that the liner panel must now be cut at 10″ x 26.5″ so that both the inside and outside match!

Now we get to the width…… If you are interested in the math that I did, I am listing it here, and if you aren’t, just scroll right past this, where you will find the cut list. If you love these baskets and want to make them with other panels or quilt blocks, I am hoping that reading through my math will help you figure out the math for your own project.

  • This pattern has 1/4″ seam allowances
  • That means the finished tube (once the 26.5″ wide panel is sewn together) will be 26″ around
  • There are four animal panels
  • I divided 26″ by 4 and got a width of 6.5″ for each animal panel not including seam allowances
  • I added back on the 1/4″ seam allowances
  • Each animal panel will need to be cut to 7″ wide

Are you following me? It is important to first take off the seam allowances, find the finished size of the blocks, and then add back on the seam allowances to EACH block.

There is one more thing! The rabbit panel is wider than the rest, and the bear panel is thinner than the rest…. I was able to cut the Fox and Owl panels into very nice 7″ wide by 10″ tall blocks with plenty of room around the bottom and sides for the seam allowances, and extra room at the top for the finishing part up there too. But, the rabbit needs a wider cut than 7″. So, I took an inch off the width of the bear block and added it to the rabbit. This worked out just fine and the basket looked great, and the spacing between the animals looked pretty even too!

The cut list (width x height) for each of the small Thicket animal blocks:

Fox: 7″ x 10″
Owl: 7″ x 10″
Bear: 6″ x 10″
Rabbit: 8″ x 10″
Lining: 26.5″ x 10″
(I used Feather Weight interfacing from Pellon for both the lining and outside of the basket, but might have used Shape Flex too, or Fusible Fleece on the outside for even more structure.)

*** Make sure to start all of your cuts the same distance below the bottom of each of the animals’ feet! In the case of the medium pop-up with the small animal print, I measured 1″ below the feet of each animal as my bottom cutting line. This will provide a straight line visually around the bottom of the basket. ***

Ok, now sew the blocks together and the flat strip should measure 26.5″ like the pattern calls for. Apply the interfacing, grab your pattern and spring, and you are all set to finish your project!

For the Extra Large sized pop-up basket, that uses the Large Thicket Animal panel:

How I figured out what size to cut each animal block

The side panel (before being sewn into a tube) is supposed to measure 17.5″ high by 45.5″ wide. The width of the panel is very important, and must not be changed. You can, though, change the height a bit as long as it doesn’t get too tall and wobbly… In order for a comfortable amount of clearance above and below the animals, I changes the height of the sides to 19″. *This means that the liner panel must now be cut at 19″ x 45.5″ too so that both the inside and outside match!

Now we get to the width…… If you are interested in the math that I did, I am listing it here, and if you aren’t, just scroll right past this, where you will find the cut list. If you love these baskets and want to make them with other panels or quilt blocks, I am hoping that reading through my math will help you figure out the math for your own project.

  • This pattern has 1/4″ seam allowances
  • That means the finished tube (once the 45.5″ wide panel is sewn together) will be 45″ around
  • There are four animal panels
  • I divided 45″ by 4 and got a width of 12.25″ for each animal panel not including seam allowances
  • I added back on the 1/4″ seam allowances
  • Each animal panel will need to be cut to 12.75″ wide

Are you following me? It is important to first take off the seam allowances, find the finished size of the blocks, and then add back on the seam allowances to EACH block.

There is one more thing! The rabbit panel is wider than the rest, and the bear panel is thinner than the rest…. I was able to cut the Fox and Owl panels into very nice 12.75″ wide by 19″ tall blocks with plenty of room around the bottom and sides for the seam allowances, and extra room at the top for the finishing part up there too. But, the rabbit needs a wider cut than 12.75″! So, I took an inch off the width of the bear block and added it to the rabbit. This worked out just fine and the basket looked great, and the spacing between the animals looked pretty even too!

The cut list (width x height) for each of the large Thicket animal blocks:

Fox: 12.75″ x 19″
Owl: 12.75″ x 19″
Bear: 11.75″ x 19″
Rabbit: 13.75″ x 19″
Lining: 45″ x 19″
(I used Feather Weight interfacing from Pellon for interfacing the lining, and Fusible Fleece on the outside for extra structure and loft.)

*** Make sure to start all of your cuts the same distance below the bottom of each of the animals’ feet! In the case of the Extra Large pop-up with the Large animal print, I measured 1.5″ below the feet of each animal as my bottom cutting line. This will provide a straight line visually around the bottom of the basket. ***

Ok, now sew the blocks together and the flat strip should measure 26.5″ like the pattern calls for. Apply the interfacing, grab your pattern and spring, and you are all set to finish your project!

Posted in Uncategorized

Citronille Patterns: Lou and Gabrielle

Katy and Abby tried out two pairs of women’s pants from Citronille: Gabrielle and Lou.

PhotoGrid_1486707365161Gabrielle is fitted at the top, with wide, loose legs. Lou is a more modern style, and is fitted through the hips and upper leg, then flaring out a bit towards the bottom.

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Katy, on the left, made the Lou pants out of a stretch denim from Robert Kaufman. She wants to point out that this is definitely a high waisted pants pattern. This can be seen a bit in Citronille’s drawing, but as you can see in the photo, they fit right up around the waist.

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She was pleased with the fit, and would make them again. The Lou pants have no front or back pockets, and Katy would definitely want to add them in her next pair. She has made pants from a variety of other patterns, and is familiar with how pockets would be added on. She would use the pockets from another pants pattern, and combine them into this one.

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Abby made her Gabrielle pants out of a navy wool flannel. She made a size 42, which is a size larger than she usually makes with other Citronille patterns. While she was concerned about doing this, there was definitely no extra room in the waist, and she was really glad that she went with the measurements on the pattern and not the size that had worked for her before.

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At first the fit for the pants wasn’t going so well, but Abby was able to make some adjustments to them and was pretty happy at the end (although she wishes she had hemmed them about an inch longer.)

While the waist fit, the hips were definitely too loose, and after sewing them up and trying them on, the hip curves were sticking out off her body, so Abby took them in a bit. She was also unhappy with how low and baggy the front crotch of the pants was, so she took the inseam in starting about six inches below the crotch of the pants, and going back down the same distance on the other side. She brought the inseam in a good inch right at the top, and after that and taking in the hips, was much more pleased with the fit.

We hope you will enjoy making your own Lou and Gabrielle pants, and that you will send us photos that we can share!

When sharing photos from this pattern, please email photos to info@fiddleheadartisansupply.com. If posting on instagram, use the hashtags #CitronilleGabrielle, #CitronilleLou –and, tag us too! #fiddleheadartisansupply

Posted in Citronille, Citronille Pattern of the Month, Shop Sample, Uncategorized

Henriette from Citronille

 

Citronille Henriette DrawingsKaty and Abby both made a Henriette dress. It is a sweet long sleeve dress with a gathered back yoke that can be worn over leggings and a shirt if you are in the colder northern states like we are, and it will be a great stand alone dress too for warmer climates. Another fun thing about this pattern is that, like many of the patterns from Citronille, it is designed for both children and adults. This pattern runs from a child’s size two all the way to an adult European size 46 (39″ chest, 33″ waist, 42″ hips).

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Katy made her Henriette dress for her daughter, who is four. She made it in a size 6 so that there would be room to grow. But, as we have found with Citronille’s patterns, they are not designed for tall people, and the size 6 length will work well for her daughter already. Katy and Abby are both pretty tall and always need to add a little bit onto the length of the patterns they make themselves and their children. Katy used a 21 wale corduroy in amethyst.

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Abby made her version in a size 38 (US 6/8) and lengthened the body and sleeves a bit, she also left off the front pocket. Abby used a bluish green chambray for her dress. Abby writes:

There are no darts in the adult pattern, and I was quite a bit worried about how it would hang on me. But, when I put it on, I was really pleased by how it fit. The top was fitted much more than I was expecting it to be, and was even a bit too tight as you can see in the pull through my chest. the lower part hung well too. I had thought that I would want to add on a belt, and that worked too, but I think I would rather just wear it loose.

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Katy’s piece of advice for this pattern (as well as many other of their patterns is that there aren’t notches on the sleeves saying which is the front and which is the back. The pattern pieces themselves have the correct sides labeled on them (Devant for front and Dos for back) but when you cut the pieces out, you will need to come up with your own system to label which side is which.

Abby and Katy were both a bit confused by the directions for the placket and found it helpful to read the directions and look at the diagrams. As you can see in the pictures, their plackets came out to very different widths, but they both work with the dresses! The directions ask you to baste 1cm from the edge when first applying the placket to the opening. You will need to stitch this with a 1cm (3/8″) seam allowance as well.

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Katy used snaps for her placket. This works well in a dress for a child where it would be worn closed all the way up. She used SnapSetter snaps. We love this snap system – they are are hammered in with an easy-to-use applicator that works well. The snaps are set into the fabric really firmly, and don’t fall out or become loose as has been our experience with sewn-in snaps. Abby wanted to be able to have the placket open a bit, so she chose to put in buttons.

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We hope you will enjoy making your own Henriette, and will send us photos that we can share!  .

When sharing photos from this pattern, please email photos to info@fiddleheadartisansupply.com and use the hashtags #citronillehenriette and, tag us too! #fiddleheadartisansupply

Posted in Belfast Maine Shop, Citronille, Citronille Pattern of the Month, Dress Pattern, Fabric store, Patterns, Sewing, Uncategorized

Just In: Rifle Paper Company’s stunning debut Fabric Collection: Les Fleurs for Cotton & Steel

We’re thrilled to offer Rifle Paper Company’s stunning debut Fabric Collection: Les Fleurs for Cotton & Steel! We carry Les Fleurs in Quilting Cotton, Cotton Lawn, Rayon, and Linen/Cotton Canvas.

 

Rifle Paper Co. is a stationery and lifestyle brand based in Florida. Anna Bond’s signature hand-painted florals & botanicals are lush and vibrant with a vintage nod.

Les Fleurs – Rayon:

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Abby made the sweet Daisy Top by Citronille in a size 36 using the Rifle Paper Co. Rayon fabric in Birch Floral “Enamel.”

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Les Fleurs – Linen/Cotton Canvas:

The Linen/Cotton Canvas by Rifle Paper Co. for Cotton & Steel have delightful patterns:

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Rifle paper cotton steelPhoto credit: Cotton & Steel

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Katy made a lovely tote bag by Noodlehead, The 241 Tote using Rifle Paper Co. Linen/Cotton Canvas: Rosa Floral in Natural, along with two coordinating Essex Linen/Cotton blends. You can make the bag with the option of side pockets or zipper pockets. Check in with us this fall, we’ll be offering three different bag making classes, and the 241 Tote will be one of them!

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Les Fleurs – Cotton Lawn:

Pink Flamingos, Pyramids, The Sphinx and Palm Trees! Les Fleurs exotic Cotton Lawn!

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Les Fleurs – Quilting Cottons:

Les Fleurs Quilting Cottons, pretty florals, tapestries, carousels, and bon voyage!

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Enjoy Rifle Paper’s stunning debut fabric collection! Feel free to post photos of what you make to these social media hashtags: #fiddleheadartisansupply  #riflepapercofabric

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Posted in Citronille, Cotton & Steel, Fabric store, Inspiration for your weekend, New at the shop, Noodlehead, Patterns, Rifle Paper Company, Sewing, Shop Sample, Uncategorized

All Settled In at 64 Main Street

On April 1st we opened up the new shop at 64 Main Street and we’re feeling settled in and excited about the new space!

Main Streetx There’s so much to see in our colorful fabric side of the shop:

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And everyone is equally excited about our expansion into art supplies. We’re now a small art store carrying professional artist quality and student grade lines, researched for the best quality and pricing.

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brushes

boardsWe look forward to seeing you this summer!

And thank you to everyone for your enthusiasm, great feedback and support during our move!

 

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Posted in Art Supllies, Belfast Maine Shop, Craft, DIY, Fabric store, Inspiration for your weekend, New at the shop

Nani IRO 2016 Double Gauze Available Now – Beautiful Japanese Fabric

We carry an extensive collection of Nani IRO Double-Gauze fabric by Japanese artist Naomi Ito. Naomi has been producing textile paintings for Kokka, since 2001.

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Naomi Ito’s breathtaking designs are seen as “art on fabric.” Painterly, impressionistic watercolors are translated on double-gauze and linen-cotton blends with bold, colorful brushstrokes inspired by landscapes and nature.

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Double-gauze is an extremely soft, beautiful, lightweight, 100% cotton fabric.

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Many of the Nani IRO double-gauze patterns portray colorful flowers and birds as well as abstract patterns with unique line detail.

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You can use double-gauze everywhere you want a soft touch: pillows, a summer skirt, wraps, tops and dresses, for baby blankets, or for a gorgeous evening bag.

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Katy made the Scout Tee Shop Sample by Grainline Studio:

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Grainline Studio has tutorials online explaining construction details, options to alter the pattern, and ideas for using different fabrics. Katy made this sample as a size 12, with Nani IRO Fuccra Rakuen Double Gauze, “A Brights / Flowers.”

We have double-gauze from other lines as well. This summery, soft baby blanket is made with Cotton + Steel “Dog Lions” Double Gauze, in Clover, by Alexia Abegg. It is backed in solid Light Green Kobayashi Double Gauze.

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The Nani IRO linen-cotton blends are great for making shift dresses, tunics & kaftans, and are wonderful for bag making and home décor use. Ann made this Merchant & Mills Trapeze Dress with the Nani IRO linen-cotton blend “Water Window,” in grey:

Merchant & Mills Nani Iro Linen dress

Enjoy working with Nani IRO double-gauze for sewing airy, summery garments inspired by landscape and watercolor prints! Let us know what you make and feel free to use this hashtag when posting online to social media: #fiddleheadartisansupply

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Posted in Dress Pattern, Inspiration for your weekend, New at the shop, Patterns, Sewing, Shop Sample, Textile Designer Nani Iro